ACE Project in Louisville working to keep kids off street by teaching art of business

The ACE Project in Louisville is ramping up efforts to curb the growing threat of youth violence in the city. ACE, or the Academy of Child Entrepreneurship, is a seven-month-long program that helps kids in the community create a business of their own. CEO and founder, Rose Smith, said the hope is to get kids invested in their future now before it’s too late.On Sunday, the organization held a graduation to celebrate the 21 kids in the program, as it marked the end of their hard work. “Okay, so when I first started my business,” said 16-year-old Danasia Jefferson. “It was really rough. It looked easy, but then when I started going into it and doing my product, I realized it wasn’t so easy.” Jefferson will be the first to say it was not a simple process. However, through hard work she was able to create Ruffles, a clothing accessories business that gives her customers a unique look. However, for Smith it’s also giving Jefferson new hope. “Danasia lost her dad to gun violence,” said Smith. “But through this she found an outlet.”Smith said the program was made in honor of Corey Crowe, her 24-year-old son who was killed in 2014, but it serves people like Danasia. People who’ve been personally impacted by gun violence.”It’s giving them hope,” said Smith. “That’s what our community, city and our world is lacking. Hope.”The graduation now means the student’s products are officially launched and on the market, but for Danaisia this is the beginning.”I’m going to stay in the entrepreneurship program for two more years,” said Jefferson. “It gives me something productive to do and also something that I like to do at the same time.”

The ACE Project in Louisville is ramping up efforts to curb the growing threat of youth violence in the city. ACE, or the Academy of Child Entrepreneurship, is a seven-month-long program that helps kids in the community create a business of their own.

CEO and founder, Rose Smith, said the hope is to get kids invested in their future now before it’s too late.

On Sunday, the organization held a graduation to celebrate the 21 kids in the program, as it marked the end of their hard work.

“Okay, so when I first started my business,” said 16-year-old Danasia Jefferson. “It was really rough. It looked easy, but then when I started going into it and doing my product, I realized it wasn’t so easy.”

Jefferson will be the first to say it was not a simple process. However, through hard work she was able to create Ruffles, a clothing accessories business that gives her customers a unique look. However, for Smith it’s also giving Jefferson new hope.

“Danasia lost her dad to gun violence,” said Smith. “But through this she found an outlet.”

Smith said the program was made in honor of Corey Crowe, her 24-year-old son who was killed in 2014, but it serves people like Danasia. People who’ve been personally impacted by gun violence.

“It’s giving them hope,” said Smith. “That’s what our community, city and our world is lacking. Hope.”

The graduation now means the student’s products are officially launched and on the market, but for Danaisia this is the beginning.

“I’m going to stay in the entrepreneurship program for two more years,” said Jefferson. “It gives me something productive to do and also something that I like to do at the same time.”

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